Kiwanis International European Federation

Serving the children of the World.

Programs

(Click the logos for more information about the various programms.)

kiwanisjr1Kiwanis Junior clubs are recognized in Europe and help to share the Kiwanis service experience with younger adults, ages 18-25. Kiwanis Junior became an official program in 1992 and now includes more than 50 clubs.

 

 

CIRCLEKCircle K is a service club for collegians and has nearly 13,000 members on more than 500 university and college campuses in 13 nations. Circle K was started in Pullman, Washington, and was formally organized as a service organization in 1947. Its members are committed to leadership, service, and fellowship.

 

 

KEYCLUBThe oldest Kiwanis youth program is Key Club. Seventeen boys in Sacramento, California, made up the first Key Club in 1925, and today the organization is active in 20 nations and includes 4,711 clubs and 234,528 members. More than 2 million youth have enlisted in Key Club since its inception, including many who are now top government and business leaders.

 

BUILDERSWhen middle school and junior high students began to show an interest in organizing to serve their schools and communities, the Builders Club program was launched in 1975. With support from Kiwanis clubs, Key Clubs, and Circle K clubs, the Builders Club network has grown to include more than 1,500 clubs and 44,000 members in 13 nations.

 

K_KIDSThis organization for elementary school-age students began in 1990 when the first club was formed in North Lauderdale, Florida, and formally adopted as a service leadership programs by Kiwanis in 1998. Today 16,164 K-Kids in 500 clubs and 11 nations are actively creating opportunities for community service, leadership development, and citizenship education

 

aktionIn October 2000, Kiwanis extended service opportunities to adult citizens living with developmental disabilities through the formation of Aktion Clubs. These clubs provide members with opportunities to develop initiative and leadership, to serve their communities, to be integrated into society, and to demonstrate the dignity and value of citizens living with developmental disabilities. To date, there are more than 2,000 members in 89 clubs.

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